Recent Storm Damage Posts

How does storm damage affect my home over time?

7/8/2019 (Permalink)

Roof problems and lost shingles

After a serious storm, you might have noticed your roof looking a little less dapper than it did before. It might have lost a few shingles, or some shingles might be bent, torn, loose, or bald. You pay for repairs and don’t think about your roof again until the next big storm. This time, you have to replace even more shingles. Over time, this pattern can result in more replacement shingles than original ones on your roof.

Replacing individual shingles after each storm can compromise the integrity of your roof over time. You may eventually start to notice leaks and other problems. Even if you don’t have functionality issues, the look of your roof might bother you, with some shingles darker than others from sun damage and age. Instead of continuously paying for repairs on an older roof, put that money toward a stronger, brand-new roofing system. A new roof is a better investment if your existing roof has sustained enough storm damage.

https://www.mrroof.com/blog/storm-damage-affect-home-time/

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How to minimize a hurricanes impact on your home

7/2/2019 (Permalink)

Essential steps can be taken to minimize a hurricane’s impact on your home.

  1. Guard your windows: Entry points like doors and windows are the weakest and most vulnerable parts of your home during a major storm. Boarding up windows with storm shutters or plywood greatly reduces the likelihood of shattering.
  2. Protect property from flooding: Flooding is the most common natural disaster and can occur anywhere. Experts recommend piling up sandbags at least 2 feet high as an effective barricade against floodwaters. It’s also a good idea to park your vehicle on higher ground, if possible, before water rises.
  3. Secure loose objects: Outdoor objects surrounding your home can become deadly airborne missiles when swept up by a hurricane’s strong winds, potentially damaging you or your neighbors’ properties. Ensure that you pick up, tie down or secure anything that could become a projectile with high winds.
  4. Prepare appliances for power outages: A lightning strike, short circuit or a downed electrical pole can cause your home’s power voltage to soar to hundreds, or even thousands, of volts. Surge protectors help to protect your electrical devices from voltage spikes caused by surges.
  5. Create a home inventory: Knowing exactly what items are in your home is critical to post-storm recovery in the event that your home or belongings are damaged. It’s as simple as snapping cell phone photos of the contents in each of your home’s rooms. Recording the item number or serial number will help you recover after the storm when you’re filing a claim with your insurance company

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/5-expert-tips-for-protecting-your-home-against-hurricane-damage/70002731

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Tornado history

5/14/2019 (Permalink)

Eight of the 10 worst U.S. tornado outbreaks have occurred in April or May, mostly due to the fact that upper echelon tornado intensities are more likely in those months. In addition, nine of the 10 worst individual tornadoes were spawned during April, May or June. 

The reason why tornadoes are more common in spring compared to other months is because the required atmospheric ingredients come together more often this time of year.

Tornado outbreaks occur when a storm system propelled by a strong, southward dip in the jet stream punches into the Plains, Midwest or South. This is accompanied by warm and humid air flowing northward out of the Gulf of Mexico.

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/news/2018-03-27-april-may-june-tornadoes-peak-months

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Flash Flood Watch

5/2/2019 (Permalink)

**FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT UNTIL THURSDAY EVENING**

A cluster of storms are moving across the DFW Metro area with heavy rain and some lightning. Rain amounts will be less than half an inch but be careful on the roads. Avoid driving through flooded roadways. The main threat will be brief heavy rain and lightning. Severe weather is not expected, but small hail will be possible.

Additional storms are expected through Friday, and some areas could see some very heavy rain. Much of North Texas may see 2 to 3 inches of rain, and a Flash Flood Watch is in effect. Remember, do not attempt to drive through flooded roadways and be sure to stay weather aware throughout the day.

https://www.nbcdfw.com/weather/stories/NBC-5-Forecast-35312994.html

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Tornado season

4/2/2019 (Permalink)

It’s that time of year to start worrying about the spring storm season. And one private weather forecaster, AccuWeather, is predicting a higher frequency of severe storm risks in Tornado Alley, which will include parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

The Dallas-Fort Worth area is often considered to be on the southern end of Tornado Alley, though one study has suggested it may be shifting eastward.

“We believe that the more traditional severe weather region of the central and southern Plains will have a higher potential for tornadoes and severe weather more frequently than they have experienced on average the past three years,” Paul Pastelok, AccuWeather’s Lead Long-Range Meteorologist, said in a news release.

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article226799754.html

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HURRICANE SEASON 2018: WHEN WILL IT END, BE OVER?

11/19/2018 (Permalink)

The hurricane season for 2018 may be coming to an end in November but that doesn’t mean more storms won’t form in the Atlantic or Pacific that can cause significant damage. The latest storm to wreak havoc on the United States, Hurricane Michael, was still making its way out of the country Thursday.

The storm made landfall near Mexico Beach, Florida, Wednesday and then continued north before crossing over Georgia and heading into the Carolinas and southeast Virginia. The storm was a Category 4 with wind speeds over 150 miles per hour and it caused significant and deadly damage after its arrival in Florida.

Hurricane season in the Atlantic started June 1 and has a few weeks left to go until it’s over. The season runs until November 30 and though storms can happen after the season is over the bulk of them usually happen within the June 1 to November 30 window. Thursday, in addition to Michael, there were Hurricane Leslie and Tropical Storm Nadine in the Atlantic.

In the Pacific, the hurricane season starts a bit earlier than in the Atlantic. The Eastern Pacific season begins May 15 and continues until November 30. Tropical Storm Sergio was brewing in the Pacific Thursday while those on the Atlantic coast were watching the remnants of Michael.

Every hurricane starts as a tropical cyclone and only becomes a hurricane when its maximum sustained wind speeds reach 74 miles per hour or higher. The cyclone first becomes a tropical depression with wind speeds of 38 miles per hour or higher and then a tropical storm when the wind speeds are between 39 and 73 miles per hour. All of these storms originate in tropical or subtropical waters

The Atlantic hurricane season peaks around the middle of September until the end of October. A chart from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows the frequency of hurricanes and tropical storms by month over a period of more than 100 years.

https://www.newsweek.com/hurricane-season-2018-end-when-1165716

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Above average storm activity in 2018

10/15/2018 (Permalink)

'Above-average' storm activity so far in 2018 hurricane season, expert says

The 2018 hurricane season has so far seen above-average storm activity and a near-normal number of major hurricanes, according to Colorado State University meteorologist Phillip Klotzbach.

Earlier in the season, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's revised forecast issued Aug. 9 noted forecasters expected a "below-normal" season with up to 13 named storms for the entire season, at least four of were to be hurricanes. This hurricane season's first forecast -- issued April 5 -- called for a "slightly above-average" season.  

With approximately 45 days left in hurricane season, the Atlantic has already seen 14.

According to data collected by Klotzbach, the 14 named storms exceeds the 12.1 average for Atlantic storm activity in an entire season. This year has already seen about 82 named stormed days, whereas in years past, about 59 days is the average. There have also been seven hurricanes, surpassing the average five. 

Major hurricanes are ranking at about average; the Atlantic has seen two so far this year, whereas the average is recorded at 2.7. This season has seen five major hurricane days, with an average set at 6.2.Hurricane season extends through Nov. 30. 

https://www.nola.com/weather/index.ssf/2018/10/2018_hurricane_season_sees_abo.html

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Hurricane Michael

10/11/2018 (Permalink)

Michael Treks Through Southeast After Leaving Florida Beach Towns in Ruins, Kills 2; Flooding Swamps North Carolina Towns

When Hurricane Michael made landfall as a high-end Category 4 storm on the Florida Panhandle Wednesday, buildings along the coast were smashed to pieces, storm-surge flooding lapped at the eaves of beach houses and an Air Force base sustained extensive damage. Two people have died in the storm, which continued to zip across Georgia and the Carolinas Thursday morning.

One death was reported in the Panhandle. A Greensboro man was killed when a tree crashed on his home, according to Gadsden County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Anglie Hightower. In southern Georgia, an 11-year-old girl was killed when a carport hit her home in Seminole County. The county coroner later identified her as Sarah Radney.

In Florida, from Panama City through Mexico Beach — where the storm made landfall — and into Apalachicola, houses were swamped or blown apart, roofs were ripped off, boats sank and trees toppled in the high winds. Aerial images at Mexico Beach Thursday morning showed extreme damage, with homes swept completely off their foundations and destroyed and few properties left standing along the coast.

"Mexico Beach took the brunt," FEMA Administrator Brock Long said. "That’s probably ground zero."

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2018-10-11-hurricane-michael-damage-florida-georgia-alabama-carolina

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Tropical Storm Rosa

10/2/2018 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm Rosa is about to make landfall and drench the arid Southwest

Deserts aren't supposed to get much rain, but Tropical Storm Rosa is flipping the script.

Rosa is expected make landfall Monday evening on Mexico's Baja California, CNN meteorologist Gene Norman said.The storm will douse Baja California with 3 to 6 inches of rain, with some spots getting up to 10 inches, the National Hurricane Center said.As it moves northeast Rosa will also dump 2 to 4 inches of rain on much of Arizona, with up to 6 inches in the Arizona mountains.  Historically, it's unusual for the US Southwest to get pummeled by a hurricane or tropical storm. But "these events have begun to increase in recent years," Norman said.Research indicates that global warming contributes to tropical storms getting "more intense, bigger and longer-lasting, thereby increasing their potential for damage," said Kevin Trenberth, senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.While there might not be a direct link between global warming and the recent increase of severe storms in the US Southwest, "it is possible that this could be a side effect of climate change," Norman said."Warmer oceans are allowing eastern Pacific storms to reach higher latitudes," he said. "This was not the case earlier. It was quite rare for an eastern Pacific storm to even reach Baja California, and this now becoming more common." https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/01/weather/tropical-storm-rosa-wxc/index.html

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Tropical Storm Kirk, which lost strength and had dissipated earlier this week as it crossed the tropical Atlantic, has strengthened and reemerged Tues

9/27/2018 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm Kirk, which lost strength and had dissipated earlier this week as it crossed the tropical Atlantic, has strengthened and reemerged Tuesday, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami. Forecasters say little additional change in strength is expected through Thursday and is expected to weaken as it crosses over the eastern Caribbean Sea.

According to the NHC's 5  p.m. EDT advisory, Kirk was located about 260 miles east of Barbados and about 380 miles east-southeast of Martinique, moving west-northwest at about 18 mph. The storm is packing maximum sustained winds of 60 mph with tropical storm-force winds reaching outward up to 115 miles from the center.

NHC's forecast says the center of Kirk will move over the Lesser Antilles by Thursday afternoon.

In the Pacific coast, weather officials are monitoring Hurricane Rosa. Forecasters said it is expected to strengthen but doesn't pose an immediate threat to land.

Tropical storm warning

  • The NHC announced a tropical storm warning for Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Martinique and Guadeloupe with tropical storm conditions that may happen within the next 36 hours.

Tropical storm watch

  • NHC said a tropical storm watch is in effect for St. Vincent and the Grenadines -- with tropical storm conditions appearing within the next 36 hours.

Possible rain fall

  • NHC says Kirk can produce total rainfall of 4 to 6 inches across the northern Windward and southern Leeward Islands -- with isolated maximum totals up to 10 inches across Martinique and Dominica. They warn of life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.

Latest forecast track

  • The NHC released an image showing Kirk's forecasted movement through the next couple of days

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/tropical-storm-kirk-strengthens-atlantic-national-hurricane-center-latest-forecast-path-track-today-2018-09-26/

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Atlantic hurricane season ramps up again with development of Leslie, Kirk

9/24/2018 (Permalink)

Atlantic hurricane season ramps up again with development of Leslie, Kirk

Following a brief lull in tropical weather across the Atlantic Basin, several areas of interest developed this past weekend, including the season's newest named storms.

Tropical Storm Kirk developed on Saturday morning. It formed at 8.3 degrees north latitude, making it the lowest latitude at which an Atlantic named storm has formed since 1902. Kirk weakened into a tropical depression late Sunday evening but is currently a tropical rainstorm. 

Kirk is moving through an area of relatively dry air, which will limit opportunities for intensification, according to Kottlowski.

"Kirk will not be a threat to land during the next few days," Kottlowski said. This will give those potentially in its track plenty of time to prepare.

The first areas to feel the impacts of Kirk will likely be the Windward Islands of the eastern Caribbean. Swells churned up by the storm could be noticeable on eastern-facing shores by midweek.

"It could threaten parts of the Windward Islands with strong to perhaps damaging winds and heavy rainfall by Thursday or Friday," Kottlowski warned.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic, Subtropical Storm Leslie formed on Sunday morning between Bermuda and the Azores. 

Leslie is expected to slowly drift eastward over the next 24-48 hours while it maintains its status as a tropical storm.

No impacts to land are expected during this time, and Leslie will likely dissipate over the open waters of the Atlantic by midweek.

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/the-tropics-are-heating-up-again-tropical-depression-kirk-and-subtropical-storm-leslie-churn-in-the-atlantic/70006140

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Hurricane season isn't over yet!

9/21/2018 (Permalink)

There is still more of hurricane season to go': Expert warns another tropical threat may make US landfall

Even though the tropical Atlantic is void of organized storms at this time, conditions may again get busy over the next couple of weeks with a few areas of potential development.

Sept. 10 marked the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season from a climatology standpoint. However, hurricane season does not officially end until Nov. 30. The coming weeks into mid-October often bring several additional tropical storms and hurricanes. This year may not be any exception.

AccuWeather long-range tropical meteorologists, led by Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski, are projecting two to four more tropical storms, of which one or two may become hurricanes, following Tropical Storm Joyce.

There have been 10 tropical storms, of which five became hurricanes. Three named systems, Alberto, Florence and Gordon, made landfall in the United States.

Thus far, Florence has been the only major hurricane (Category 3 or higher) in the basin.

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/there-is-still-more-of-hurricane-season-to-go-expert-warns-another-tropical-threat-may-make-us-landfall/70006119

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Hurricane Florence Aftermath

9/19/2018 (Permalink)

Florence aftermath is a 'nightmare' of swollen rivers, flooding and rising deaths

(CNN)Hurricane Florence's rainfall has stopped, but its "nightmare" destruction isn't over yet.

On Wednesday, thousands of evacuees were urged to stay away from their homes, rivers kept rising, and the threat of floods remained high in North and South Carolina. Many roads remained closed,and thousands of people lack power.President Donald Trump spoke with state and federal officials about 11 a.m. ET at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point on the Neuse River in North Carolina. Trump said the federal government would do everything necessary to ensure recovery. He praised first responders and said the country mourns with the families of the at least 36 people killed by Florence."Our state took a gut punch and our state is still reeling," North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper told Trump, calling the storm "epic, disastrous and widespread."  "We've got a long road ahead in the days, in the months and even years ahead to make sure we build back." https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/19/us/florence-wednesday-wxc/index.html 

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UPDATE on Hurricane Florence

9/11/2018 (Permalink)

Expanding in size, violent Hurricane Florence is continuing on a beeline toward the East Coast as an “extremely dangerous” Category 4 hurricane. Catastrophic flooding and destructive winds are becoming very likely in the eastern Carolinas.

Forecasts generally project the storm to make landfall between northern South Carolina and North Carolina’s Outer Banks as a strong Category 3  on Thursday, although shifts in the track are possible and storm impacts will expand great distances beyond where landfall occurs.

The National Hurricane Center is warning of a triple threat in the Carolinas and Virginia:

  1. A “life-threatening storm surge” at the coast — a rise in ocean water over normally dry land.
  2. “Life-threatening freshwater flooding from a prolonged and exceptionally heavy rainfall event” from the coast to interior sections.
  3. “Damaging hurricane-force winds” at the coast and some distance inland.

Like Hurricane Harvey, which stalled over Texas in 2017, Florence could linger over the Southeast for several days after landfall, unloading 15 to 20 inches of rain and isolated amounts to 30 inches. The Hurricane Center said this “could produce catastrophic flash flooding.”

The flooding might be similar to or worse than what the Carolinas experienced during Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

More than 1.5 million people have been ordered to evacuate coastal areas ahead of the storm, due to both destructive winds and storm surge which could place normally dry land under at least 10 feet of water.

“All interests from South Carolina into the Mid-Atlantic region should ensure they have their hurricane plan in place and follow any advice given by local officials,” the Hurricane Center said.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2018/09/11/hurricane-florence-watches-posted-as-extremely-dangerous-florence-churns-toward-carolinas/?utm_term=.ecf5ee1a8b4f

 

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Hurricane Florence headed to Carolina

9/10/2018 (Permalink)

Approximately 800 South Carolina National Guard soldiers and airmen have been mobilized to prepare, respond and participate in recovery efforts associated with Hurricane Florence, according to a statement from the 169th Fighter Wing Public Affairs Office.

The guard personnel are deploying from McEntire Joint National Guard Base near Columbia and heading to Bluffton, South Carolina, for assignment, according to the statement.

 

What we're covering here

  • Hurricane Florence has its sights set on the Carolinas, and if it hits as hard as predicted, the storm will be the most powerful to pound the area in three decades.
  • ETA: The storm is expected to approach the Southeastern US coast on Thursday as a Category 4 storm or higher. Track it here.

https://www.cnn.com/us/live-news/hurricane-florence-dle/index.html

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Hurricane Florence

9/7/2018 (Permalink)

MIAMI —

After intensifying into a major hurricane, Florence substantially weakened and was reclassified as a tropical storm Friday morning with sustained winds of 65 miles per hour.

"Florence's structure continues to be negatively affected by strong southwesterly shear," the National Hurricane Center wrote in a 5 a.m. update. 

>>>Checklist: Be prepared for a hurricane

However, in the next 48 hours, the storm is expected to restrengthen.

On Wednesday, Florence became the first major hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic season, with maximum sustained winds peaking at 130 mph, making it a Category 4 hurricane, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Florence is expected regain major hurricane intensity (Category 3 or greater) by early next week -- as the storm moves northwest, getting closer to the US coastline by the day.

It's too early to tell if the storm will make landfall somewhere on the East Coast, or if it will turn harmlessly back to sea.

Still, there are some troubling signs in the major computer models that meteorologists use to predict hurricane tracks a week or more in advance.

The European and American models have shifted westward in the past two days, consistently showing a menacing hurricane coming dangerously close to the Eastern Seaboard.

There are dozens of different models and versions of forecast tracks that meteorologists have among their forecasting tools, and a majority still show the center of Florence staying offshore -- but most track it close enough to cause some impact next week.

Florence should track south of Bermuda early next week but will be close enough to bring gusty winds and dangerous surf conditions. Large swells will also begin affecting the Southeastern US coastlines, with larger waves and rough surf as early as this weekend, increasing through next week.

Florence's track will depend on the development and movement of a number of weather systems as the storm gets steered by a large ridge of high pressure in the Eastern United States and northern Atlantic as well as the progress of a low pressure trough across the country.

But East Coast residents can feel reassured about one thing: More than 75 storms have passed within 200 miles of Florence's current location in the Atlantic since hurricane records began in the 1850s, and not a single one made a US landfall.

Even if Florence stays out to sea, models show other systems developing over the Atlantic, almost on cue as the hurricane season hits its peak Monday. The eight weeks around then often are prime time for the conditions that fuel powerful storms.

The National Hurricane Center is monitoring a couple of other tropical waves in the eastern Atlantic that it says are likely to develop into tropical storms in the next several days.

https://www.wesh.com/article/tropical-storm-florence-expected-to-restrengthen/22976790

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Tropical Storm Gordon

9/4/2018 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm Gordon threatens Gulf Coast, hurricane warning in place

Tropical Storm Gordon continued to gain strength Tuesday morning and is expected to become a hurricane by the time it hits the central U.S. Gulf Coast, including coastal Mississippi -- just as the hurricane season reaches its peak period.

Voluntary evacuation orders were issued Monday for parts of Louisiana for residents in areas outside the levee protection system. Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency Monday and said 200 National Guard troops will be deployed to southeastern Louisiana.

The National Hurricane Center said at 11 a.m. ET that the storm was centered 145 miles east-southeast of the Mississippi River. Maximum sustained winds were clocked at 65 mph. After making landfall, it is expected to charge inland over the lower Mississippi Valley on Wednesday.

"Tropical Storm Gordon is forecast to intensify to a minimal hurricane before making landfall near Mississippi tonight before midnight," Fox News Senior Meteorologist Janice Dean said Tuesday. "Luckily the storm will be a quick mover lessening impacts from being a prolonged event."

The hurricane warning was placed into effect for the area stretching from the mouth of the Pearl River in Mississippi to the Alabama-Florida border. As much as 8 inches of rain could fall in some parts of the Gulf states through late Thursday.

"Heavy rain will accompany Gordon along its track, spreading an extensive swath of 3 to 6 inches will locally higher amounts," Dean said. "Severe thunderstorms will also be likely over parts of the Gulf Coast with damaging winds and isolated tornadoes."

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/09/04/tropical-storm-gordon-threatens-gulf-coast-hurricane-warning-in-place.html

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HURRICANE SEASON IS COMING TO LIFE

8/29/2018 (Permalink)

Weather models have flipped the switch': Hurricane season coming to life in the Atlantic

The sleeping giant may be about to awaken.

Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico is forecast to ramp up over the next couple of weeks. "Weather models have flipped the switch on the Atlantic hurricane season and see multiple areas of development possible starting mainly this weekend," weather.us meteorologist Ryan Maue said.  

One storm could spin up in the Caribbean over the next couple of days and potentially affect Florida over the Labor Day weekend. Looking further ahead, "there is the potential for two or three tropical features spinning over the Atlantic by the second weekend in September," AccuWeather meteorologist Dan Kottlowski said.

The next tropical storm or hurricane in the Atlantic basin will be called Florence.

One of the reasons for the predicted uptick in activity is that wind shear, which tends to rip apart developing hurricanes, appears to be decreasing. "There are signs now that wind shear may drop over a significant part of the Atlantic basin over the next couple of weeks," according to AccuWeather meteorologist Bernie Rayno.

However, it's still too early to predict exactly where or when any storm might form or whether a storm will affect land areas.  

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/08/29/hurricane-season-coming-life-atlantic/1132669002/

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Hurricane Lane has a successor

8/27/2018 (Permalink)

TROPICAL STORM MIRIAM PATH: HAWAII'S HURRICANE LANE HAS A SUCCESSOR

Thankfully, Miriam is not likely to come near Hawaii. Although its current path is expected to track west until Wednesday, Miriam will then begin heading north. At its closest, it should be around 600 miles east of Hawaii.

Tropical storms are upgraded to hurricanes once they exceed wind speeds of 74 miles per hour. Miriam is traveling at a speed of around 14 mph. At the time of this writing, there were no warnings in place for the tropical storm.

Just days after Hawaii appeared to avoid the worst from Hurricane Lane, a new tropical storm has formed in the Pacific.

Tropical Storm Miriam has formed about 2,000 miles east of Hawaii, with maximum wind speeds of around 60 miles per hour. According to the National Hurricane Center (NRC), Miriam is strengthening and is expected to turn into a hurricane on Monday night.

“Miriam's cloud pattern and overall convective organization have continued to improve, with a tight comma-cloud pattern now evident in infrared imagery,” the NRC said in a report. “Steady strengthening still appears likely for the next couple of days.”

Thankfully, Miriam is not likely to come near Hawaii. Although its current path is expected to track west until Wednesday, Miriam will then begin heading north. At its closest, it should be around 600 miles east of Hawaii.

Tropical storms are upgraded to hurricanes once they exceed wind speeds of 74 miles per hour. Miriam is traveling at a speed of around 14 mph. At the time of this writing, there were no warnings in place for the tropical storm.

https://www.newsweek.com/tropical-storm-miriam-path-hawaiis-hurricane-lane-has-successor-1091196

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Hurricane Lane brings over 31 inches of rain to the Big Island

8/24/2018 (Permalink)

Hurricane Lane churns toward Hawaii, Big Island has already seen over 31 inches of rain

As Hurricane Lane lurches north, the Category 3 storm has already dumped more than 31 inches of rain on Hawaii's Big Island, bringing catastrophic flooding.

The life-threatening flooding could even lead to landslides or mudslides.

Rainfall rates in the outer bands of the hurricane may reach 1 to 3 inches per hour, meaning flash flood watches will remain in effect through late Friday.

Lane is expected to remain a hurricane for the next 12 to 24 hours but increasing wind shear could weaken the storm more quickly over the next two to three days.

The storm is forecast to pull away from Hawaii by late Saturday.

https://abcnews.go.com/US/extreme-flooding-reported-hurricane-lane-nears-hawaii/story?id=57374083

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Hurricane Lane

8/21/2018 (Permalink)

Hurricane Lane, a major hurricane, could turn toward Hawaii this week

Another hurricane is threatening to impact Hawaii this week, as dangerous Category 3 Hurricane Lane approaches the Central Pacific island chain just two weeks after Hurricane Hector passed the islands.

Lane has maximum winds of 125 mph (201 km/h) and is located about 600 miles (965 km) southeast of Hawaii's big island.The storm is currently moving westward at 14 mph (22 km/h) and should continue to move west over the next day or so. But forecast models are indicating that Lane will turn in a more northerly direction by late Tuesday and Wednesday, which could put it on track to bring significant impacts to the islands.There has been a significant jump to the north in the forecast models over the past 24 hours, bringing the Hawaiian Islands squarely into the five-day forecast cone issued by the Central Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu.  Track the storm hereThe National Weather Service in Hawaii has already issued a Tropical Storm Watch for the southern and western portions of the Big Island's coastline."Strong winds associated with Hurricane Lane may impact waters south of the Big Island as early as Wednesday morning, with rough seas and swells expected to increase Tuesday night," according to the NWS.https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/20/us/hawaii-hurricane-lane-wxc/index.html 

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4 things seen in the tropics this past week

8/13/2018 (Permalink)

4 Interesting Things We Saw in the Tropics in the Past Week

At a Glance

  1. Hector was a major hurricane in the northeastern Pacific longer than any other hurricane on record in that basin.
  2. Tropical Storm Debby became the fourth named storm of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season.
  3. Four named tropical cyclones were active at once in the eastern half of the Pacific Ocean.
  4. Typhoon Shanshan scraped parts of mainland Japan.

Several interesting things caught our eye in the tropics in the past week, including Hurricane Hector's length of time as major hurricane in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Debby's formation in the Atlantic Ocean, an active eastern half of the Pacific Ocean and Typhoon Shanshan's scrape with Japan.

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2018-08-11-interesting-things-we-saw-in-the-tropics-early-august

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7 Predicted Hurricanes

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

Atlantic Could Spawn Up to 7 Hurricanes in the 2018 Storm Season

With four storms already in the books, the Atlantic is expected to produce a total of nine to 13 named storms during the six-month hurricane season that ends Nov. 30, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said.

That’s down from the 10 to 16 systems of tropical-storm strength or greater the agency that oversees the National Weather Service called for in May. Of the total announced Thursday, four to seven could become hurricanes, with only one, or perhaps even none, becoming a major system with winds of 111 miles per hour or more. A storm is named when winds reach at least 39 mph.

“All of these numbers are lower than we predicted in May,” Gerry Bell, hurricane forecaster with the U.S. Climate Prediction Center.

http://fortune.com/2018/08/09/atlantic-hurricane-season-2018/

SERVPRO of South Arlington is here 24/7 365, waiting to serve you with all of your restoration needs.

Subtropical Storm Debby

8/7/2018 (Permalink)

As the 2018 hurricane season enters its busiest months, conditions remain very active in the Pacific.

In the Atlantic, a low-pressure system that had a 20 percent chance for development Monday grew into Subtropical Storm Debby Tuesday morning.

Hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

Subtropical Storm Debby formed in the North Atlantic late Tuesday.

  • Location: 1,160 miles west of the Azores
  • Maximum sustained winds: 40 mph
  • Movement: north at 16 mph

At 11 a.m., the  center of Subtropical Storm Debby was located near 1,160 miles west of the Azores. 

https://www.tcpalm.com/story/weather/hurricanes/2018/08/07/hurricanes-hector-john-churn-pacific-atlantic-system-has-50-chance-development/921480002/

SERVPRO of South Arlington is here 24/7 365, so call us today at 817-557-1505. SERVPRO of South Arlington is waiting to serve you with all of your restoration needs.

Fewer storms predicted

7/30/2018 (Permalink)

Atlantic hurricane season forecast changes for the better with fewer storms predicted

Some good news from top hurricane forecasters: The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season should be quieter than normal, according to a new predictionreleased Monday.

Meteorologist Phil Klotzbach and other experts from Colorado State University – regarded as the nation's top seasonal hurricane forecasters – predict 10 named tropical storms will form, of which four will become hurricanes.

That is a sharp decrease from their forecast in April, when they said 7 hurricanes would form. One system, Subtropical Storm Alberto, already formed in May.

If the quiet forecast comes to fruition, 2018 will be a welcome relief after the destructive 2017 season, which saw monsters like Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria tear paths of death and destruction across the Caribbean and the U.S.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/07/03/hurricane-season-2018-forecast/755215002/

SERVPRO of South Arlington is here 24/7 365, waiting to serve you with all of your restoration needs. 

Hurricane Season in full force

7/23/2018 (Permalink)

2018 Atlantic hurricane season.

 
The 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 to November 30. The areas covered include the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.The National Weather Service defines a hurricane as a "tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher."  Hurricanes are rated according to intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The 1-5 scale estimates potential property damage.A Category 3 or higher is considered a major hurricane.The National Hurricane Center advises preparedness:hurricane watch indicates the possibility that a region could experience hurricane conditions within 48 hours.A hurricane warning indicates that sustained winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 36 hours. https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/10/us/2018-atlantic-hurricane-season-fast-facts/index.html

 Contact SERVPRO of South Arlington for all of your restoration needs, our South Arlington office is ready to serve you 817-557-1505. With over 1,700 Franchises nationwide, SERVPRO is a leader in the restoration industry and its professionals are faster to any size disaster. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are available 24 hours/7 days a week and are ready to restore or clean your property. 

5 Simple Ways to Protect Your Car From Hail Damage.

5/3/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage 5 Simple Ways to Protect Your Car From Hail Damage. If you are caught in a hail storm while driving find covered parking ASAP!

Hail storms can cause thousands of dollars of damage to your home and your car! As Texas natives we understand that the weather is unpredictable and you have to be ready for anything! At SERVPRO of South Arlington we believe that knowledge is key in preventing further damage to your property. 

Here are 5 simple ways to prevent damage to your property and your wallet!

  1. Stay informed on current weather conditions.  As mentioned previously knowledge is key in preventing property damage. And staying aware of incoming storms could save you thousands of dollars in restoration fees. 
  1. If you are caught in a hail storm while driving find covered parking ASAP.

    If you find yourself caught in a hail storm, try to find covered parking as soon as possible. Locate the nearest covered parking examples include; parking garages, gas stations, etc.

  2. Use blankets or hail car cover if you are not near covered shelter.

    If you’re unable to find shelter during a hail storm, to avoid further damage you can cover your car with blankets or a hail car cover. These may not stop all dents from occurring but they will reduce them and save you money.

  3. If you don’t have blankets use your floor mats.

    If you forgot to pack your blankets or a hail car cover, you can use your floor mats to place over your windshield to help prevent the hail from breaking it. The floor mats will break the fall of the hail and assist in preventing further damage. 

  4. If you are driving in a storm move your car closer to a building to protect your car from hail damage. 

    If you noticed the storm coming from a certain direction, move your car to the opposite side to avoid it.

When Storms or Floods hit South Arlington, SERVPRO is ready!

3/29/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage  When Storms or Floods hit South Arlington, SERVPRO is ready! Our highly trained crews are ready to respond 24/7 to storm or flood damage in South Arlington!

SERVPRO of South Arlingtonspecializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit South Arlington, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (817)557-1505

11 Days until Christmas

12/14/2017 (Permalink)

Christmas facts....

 1. The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.

2. The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.

3. In Poland spiders are considered to be symbols of prosperity and goodness at Christmas. In fact, spiders and spider webs are often used as Christmas tree decorations. According to legend, a spider wove baby Jesus a blanket to keep him warm.

4.The tradition of hanging stockings comes from a Dutch legend. A poor man had three daughters for whom he could not afford to provide a dowry. St. Nicholas dropped a bag of gold down his chimney and gold coins fell out and into the stockings drying by the fireplace. The daughters now had dowries and could be married, avoiding a life on the streets.

5. “White Christmas”, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”, “Winter Wonderland”, “The Christmas Song” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” plus the melody for “O Holy Night” were all written or co-written by Jews.

Source: http://thefactfile.org/interesting-facts-christmas/

Frozen Pipes an Issue at Home?

12/14/2017 (Permalink)

Why Pipe Freezing is a Problem

Water has a unique property in that it expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the strength of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break.

Pipes that freeze most frequently are:

Pipes that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, and water sprinkler lines.

Water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets.

Pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation.

How to Protect Pipes From Freezing

Before the onset of cold weather, protect your pipes from freezing by following these recommendations:

Drain water from swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.

Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.

Add insulation to attics, basements and crawl spaces. Insulation will maintain higher temperatures in these areas.

Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located in unheated areas. Look in the garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.

Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes.

Consider relocating exposed pipes to provide increased protection from freezing.

How to Prevent Frozen Pipes

Keep garage doors closed if there are water supply lines in the garage.

Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.

When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing.

Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.

If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.

 If you are need of mitigation services please feel free to call SERVPRO of South Arlington at 817-557-1505. 

Freezing Temperatures

12/7/2017 (Permalink)

With the sudden change in temperature meteorologists are predicting that we could be experiencing freezing temperatures soon. With this in mind it is wise to be proactive to keep your pipes from freezing and then bursting.

To prevent water pipes from freezing in cold weather:

  1. Open cabinet doors under sinks located on outside walls.
  2. Leave hot and cold water dripping in faucets.
  3. Put foam covers over outdoor spigots.
  4. Insulate water pipes with foam pipe insulation.

In the case that we do encounter freezing temperatures and you faced with a broken pipe please feel free to contact us to help. SERVPRO of South Arlington will be more than happy to assist you in minimizing the damages to your home or business.

Call SERVPRO of South Arlington: 817-557-1505.

Stay Safe during this storm season!

6/21/2017 (Permalink)

While there are a number of other dangerous weather situations that can pop up two of the most severe are hurricanes and tropical storms. These are storms that can cause property damage, flooding and if people are not prepared could cause a loss of life.

Both hurricanes and tropical storms originate in tropical areas and are differentiated by severity. Both have heavy winds and rain. However, hurricanes are generally stronger storms with more rain and stronger wind. Regardless of the severity, they both are dangerous and people need to prepare in the event of being in the path of a strong storm.

In the event of hearing that a hurricane or tropical storm is coming to your area, there are a few things to be prepared in order to remain safe. If you find yourself in the path of a major storm the first thing is to make sure you get inside a secure building. Also, securing any doors and windows in advance of the storm may prevent any injury.

BEFORE A HURRICANE:

  • Have a disaster plan ready. List SERVPRO of South Arlington as a contact to assist after the storm has hit, 817-557-1505
  • Have a pet plan. Before a storm threatens, contact your veterinarian or local humane society for information on preparing your pets for an emergency.
  • Board up windows.
  • Bring in outdoor objects that could blow away.
  • Make sure you know which county or parish you live in.
  • Know where all the evacuation routes are.
  • Prepare a disaster supplies kit for your home and car. Have enough food and water for at least 3 days. Include a first aid kit, canned food and a can opener, bottled water, battery-operated radio, flashlight, protective clothing and written instructions on how to turn off electricity, gas, and water.
  • Have a NOAA weather radio handy with plenty of batteries, so you can listen to storm advisories.
  • Have some cash handy. Following a hurricane, banks and ATMs may be temporarily closed.
  • Make sure your car is filled with gasoline.

DURING A HURRICANE:

  • Stay away from low-lying and flood prone areas.
  • Always stay indoors during a hurricane, because strong winds will blow things around.
  • Leave mobile homes and to go to a shelter.
  • If your home isn’t on higher ground, go to a shelter.
  • If emergency managers say to evacuate, then do so immediately.

AFTER A HURRICANE:

  • Stay indoors until it is safe to come out.
  • Check for injured or trapped people, without putting yourself in danger.
  • Watch out for flooding which can happen after a hurricane.
  • Do not attempt to drive in flooding water.
  • Stay away from standing water. It may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.

Don’t drink tap water until officials say it’s safe to do so.

LIGHTNING/ HAIL... What do you do?

4/26/2017 (Permalink)

What do you do when you have checked the weather, it states no rain in the forecast and then you wake up to pouring rain, lightning strikes, and hail? This was our issue this morning.

So I checked my phone last night there was no rain in the forecast! As I am getting ready to come to work it's pouring outside and the thunder is so loud that my dogs are going crazy. Then I open garage door and there is hail coming down like crazy. Obviously the weatherman didn't get it right today.

If you woke up this morning to the same situation then it is highly possible that you extremely frustrated because of the traffic and because everyone seems to be driving irrationally.

Did your home get struck by hail? If so we are here to help.

Hail damage can lead to roof damage and roof damage to water damage. If you experiencing water damage in your home or business due to our unexpected storm please call us we are here to get you back in preloss condition as soon as possible. Do not leave what can be taken care of today for tomorrow. Leaving a water damage unattended can be very pricey in long run. What may seem very minimal can lead to mold damage. Who wants to deal with MOLD?

Did your home get struck by lightning? If so we are here to help.

When lightning strikes it can be very devastating. Lightning striking sometimes causes fires. SERVPRO can assist you in helping tarp your roof, determining between salvageable and non-salvageable contents, tree removal, cleaning soot, packing out contents, etc. We are a phone call away!  

Call us:

972-602-1112~ 817-557-1447~ 817-557-1505

SERVPRO Storm Team

11/1/2013 (Permalink)

Storm Damage SERVPRO Storm Team SERVPRO working on a school during an ice storm.

Did you know that SERVPRO has the largeset inventory of drying equipment in the United States.  We use that equipment when storms come do the most damage.  We have served in New York, New Jersey, Colorado, Louisianna, and Oklahoma in the last 12 months.